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Quick reference medical handouts used by Pediatric offices


Fluoride Recommendations for Children


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In a recent position paper, the American Dental Association made the following fluoride recommendations for children:

Fluoride Toothpaste

Parents and caregivers should ensure that young children use an appropriate-size toothbrush with a small brushing surface and only a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste at each brushing. Young children should always be supervised while brushing and taught to spit out rather than swallow toothpaste. Many children under age six have not fully developed their swallowing reflex and may be more likely to inadvertently swallow fluoride toothpaste. Unless advised to do so by a dentist or other healthcare professional, parents should not use fluoride toothpaste for children less than two years of age.

Fluoride Mouth Rinse

Fluoride mouth rinses have been shown to help prevent tooth decay for both children and adults. However, the ADA does not recommend use of fluoride mouth rinses for children under six years of age, unless recommended by a dentist or other health professional. Children under six may be more likely to inadvertently swallow mouth rinse.

Dietary Fluoride Supplements

Children should only receive dietary supplemental fluoride tablets or drops as prescribed by their physician or dentist based on the dietary fluoride supplement schedule approved by the ADA, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Supplements are not recommended for children under six months of age.

Naturally-Occurring Fluoride in Water

The optimal fluoride level in drinking water is 0.7-1.2 mg/L (or 0.7-1.2 parts per million (ppm)), an amount that has been proven beneficial in reducing tooth decay. Naturally- occurring fluoride may be below or above these levels in some areas. Under the Safe Drinking Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires notification by the water supplier if the fluoride level exceeds 2.0 ppm. People living in areas where naturally- occurring fluoride levels in drinking water exceed 2.0 ppm should consider an alternative water source or home water treatments to reduce the risk of fluorosis, in young children.

courtesy of the American Dental Association an d posted 04-26-07 on kidsgrowth.com

 

 

 

As a reminder, this information should not be relied on as medical advice and is not intended to replace the advice of your child’s pediatrician. Please read our full disclaimer.

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