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Quick reference medical handouts used by Pediatric offices


What is Lichen Striatus


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Lichen striatus

What is lichen striatus?

Lichen striatus is an uncommon self-limiting skin rash that occurs mainly in children. It presents as pink raised spots that join together to form one or more dull red slightly scaly linear bands.

Why does it occur and who is at risk?

The cause of lichen striatus is unknown. Possibly genetic factors or environmental triggers have a role to play in its development. Over 50% of cases occur in children aged between 5 and 15 years. It appears in females two or three times as often as in males.

What does it look like?

Lichen striatus starts as small pink, red or flesh coloured spots that over the course of one or two weeks join together to form a dull red slightly scaly linear band. The band is usually 2mm to 2cm in width and may be a few centimetres in length or may extend the entire length of the arm or leg. Sometimes there are two parallel bands. Lesions occur most commonly on one arm or leg but can affect the neck or trunk. Sometimes a band may extend from the leg onto the buttock or abdomen. Usually there are no symptoms but some patients may complain of slight or intense itching. Occasionally nails may be affected, sometimes without any skin lesions. They become thick, ridged, split and may rarely fall off altogether.


What treatments are available?

There is no effective treatment for lichen striatus and in most cases none is necessary. It usually resolves within 6 months but may leave temporary pale or dark marks (hypopigmentation or hyperpigmentation).

Emollients or topical steroids may be used to help treat dryness or itching, if present.

 

As a reminder, this information should not be relied on as medical advice and is not intended to replace the advice of your child’s pediatrician. Please read our full disclaimer.

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