Subscribe to the free KidsGrowth weekly email newsletter by entering your email address below.





















  

  

Advertisements:
Advertising links will direct you off of the KidsGrowth Web site. KidsGrowth is neither responsible for nor does it necessarily endorse the privacy practices, content or products of these sites.

Should schools "profile" all students to identify those who may become violent?
Yes: No:

Quick reference medical handouts used by Pediatric offices


What is Scabies?


Scabies

see also: Lice, Scabies do not reflect on hygiene

What is scabies?

Scabies is an infestation of the skin with the microscopic mite Sarcoptes scabei. Infestation is common, found worldwide, and affects people of all races and social classes. Scabies spreads rapidly under crowded conditions where there is frequent skin-to-skin contact between people, such as in hospitals, institutions, child-care facilities, and nursing homes.

What are the signs and symptoms of scabies infestation?

  • Pimple-like irritations, burrows or rash of the skin, especially the webbing between the fingers; the skin folds on the wrist, elbow, or knee; the penis, the breast, or shoulder blades.
  • Intense itching, especially at night and over most of the body.
  • Sores on the body caused by scratching. These sores can sometimes become infected with bacteria.

How do children get scabies?

By direct, prolonged, skin-to-skin contact with another adult or child already infested with scabies. Contact must be prolonged (a quick handshake or hug will usually not spread infestation). Infestation is easily spread to household members. Infestation may also occur by sharing clothing, towels, and bedding.

How long will mites live?

Once away from the human body, mites do not survive more than 48-72 hours. When living on a person, an adult female mite can live up to a month.

Did my pet spread scabies to my child?

No. Pets become infested with a different kind of scabies mite. If your pet is infested with scabies, (also called mange) and they have close contact with you, the mite can get under your skin and cause itching and skin irritation. However, the mite dies in a couple of days and does not reproduce. The mites may cause your child to itch for several days, but they do not need to be treated with special medication to kill the mites. Until your pet is successfully treated, mites can continue to burrow into your child's skin and cause them to have symptoms.

How soon after infestation will symptoms begin?

For a child who has never been infested with scabies, symptoms may take 4-6 weeks to begin. For a youngster who has had scabies, symptoms appear within several days. Neither children nor adults become immune to an infestation.

How is scabies infestation diagnosed?

Diagnosis is most commonly made by looking at the burrows or rash. A skin scraping may be taken to look for mites, eggs, or mite fecal matter to confirm the diagnosis. If a skin scraping or biopsy is taken and returns negative, it is possible that your child may still be infested. Typically, there are fewer than 10 mites on the entire body of an infested person; this makes it easy for an infestation to be missed.

Can scabies be treated?

Yes. Several lotions are available to treat scabies. Always follow the directions provided by your child's physician or the directions on the package insert. Apply lotion to a clean body from the neck down to the toes and left overnight (8 hours). After 8 hours, take a bath or shower to wash off the lotion. Put on clean clothes. All clothes, bedding, and towels used by the infested child 2 days before treatment should be washed in hot water; dry in a hot dryer. A second treatment of the body with the same lotion may be necessary 7-10 days later. Children are often treated with milder scabies medications than adults.

Who should be treated for scabies?

Anyone who is diagnosed with scabies or who has had close, prolonged contact to an infested person should also be treated. If your health care provider has instructed family members to be treated, everyone should receive treatment at the same time to prevent reinfestation.

How soon after treatment will I feel better?

Itching may continue for 2-3 weeks, and does not mean that you are still infested. Your health care provider my prescribe additional medication to relieve itching if it is severe. No new burrows


courtesy of the CDC and posted on kidsgrowth.com 05-20-04

Scabies

see also: Lice, Scabies do not reflect on hygiene

What is scabies?

Scabies is an infestation of the skin with the microscopic mite Sarcoptes scabei. Infestation is common, found worldwide, and affects people of all races and social classes. Scabies spreads rapidly under crowded conditions where there is frequent skin-to-skin contact between people, such as in hospitals, institutions, child-care facilities, and nursing homes.

What are the signs and symptoms of scabies infestation?

  • Pimple-like irritations, burrows or rash of the skin, especially the webbing between the fingers; the skin folds on the wrist, elbow, or knee; the penis, the breast, or shoulder blades.
  • Intense itching, especially at night and over most of the body.
  • Sores on the body caused by scratching. These sores can sometimes become infected with bacteria.

How do children get scabies?

By direct, prolonged, skin-to-skin contact with another adult or child already infested with scabies. Contact must be prolonged (a quick handshake or hug will usually not spread infestation). Infestation is easily spread to household members. Infestation may also occur by sharing clothing, towels, and bedding.

How long will mites live?

Once away from the human body, mites do not survive more than 48-72 hours. When living on a person, an adult female mite can live up to a month.

Did my pet spread scabies to my child?

No. Pets become infested with a different kind of scabies mite. If your pet is infested with scabies, (also called mange) and they have close contact with you, the mite can get under your skin and cause itching and skin irritation. However, the mite dies in a couple of days and does not reproduce. The mites may cause your child to itch for several days, but they do not need to be treated with special medication to kill the mites. Until your pet is successfully treated, mites can continue to burrow into your child's skin and cause them to have symptoms.

How soon after infestation will symptoms begin?

For a child who has never been infested with scabies, symptoms may take 4-6 weeks to begin. For a youngster who has had scabies, symptoms appear within several days. Neither children nor adults become immune to an infestation.

How is scabies infestation diagnosed?

Diagnosis is most commonly made by looking at the burrows or rash. A skin scraping may be taken to look for mites, eggs, or mite fecal matter to confirm the diagnosis. If a skin scraping or biopsy is taken and returns negative, it is possible that your child may still be infested. Typically, there are fewer than 10 mites on the entire body of an infested person; this makes it easy for an infestation to be missed.

Can scabies be treated?

Yes. Several lotions are available to treat scabies. Always follow the directions provided by your child's physician or the directions on the package insert. Apply lotion to a clean body from the neck down to the toes and left overnight (8 hours). After 8 hours, take a bath or shower to wash off the lotion. Put on clean clothes. All clothes, bedding, and towels used by the infested child 2 days before treatment should be washed in hot water; dry in a hot dryer. A second treatment of the body with the same lotion may be necessary 7-10 days later. Children are often treated with milder scabies medications than adults.

Who should be treated for scabies?

Anyone who is diagnosed with scabies or who has had close, prolonged contact to an infested person should also be treated. If your health care provider has instructed family members to be treated, everyone should receive treatment at the same time to prevent reinfestation.

How soon after treatment will I feel better?

Itching may continue for 2-3 weeks, and does not mean that you are still infested. Your health care provider my prescribe additional medication to relieve itching if it is severe. No new burrows


courtesy of the CDC and posted on kidsgrowth.com 05-20-04

 

As a reminder, this information should not be relied on as medical advice and is not intended to replace the advice of your child’s pediatrician. Please read our full disclaimer.

Advertisements:
Advertising links will direct you off of the KidsGrowth Web site. KidsGrowth is neither responsible for
nor does it necessarily endorse the privacy practices, content or products of these sites.





| home | contact us | about us |

| parenting & behavioral | child development | growth milestones |

| childhood conditions | seesaw | book reviews | Advertise on KidsGrowth


Copyright © 1999-2014 KG Investments, LLC.

Usage Policy and Disclaimer and Privacy Policy



Web Design by Gecko Media