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Should schools "profile" all students to identify those who may become violent?
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Quick reference medical handouts used by Pediatric offices


My Child is Wheezing


Wheezing is a high purring or whistling sound that you usually hear on breathing out. It is caused by air flowing through swollen breathing tubes. 

Wheezing in children is most often caused by:

  • Asthma 
  • An infection in the respiratory tract infection
  • A foreign body caught in the air tubes 
  • A congenital lung problem that the child was born with
  • Pneumonia

 

Is your child turning blue or not breathing?

Yes

Call "911" and do CPR on  your child until help arrives

No

Is your child short of breath and/or coughing up bubbly pink or white phlegm?

Yes

Call your child's
healthcare provider
immediately or go to 
the nearest emergency room

No

Did your child's wheezing start soon after they choked on food or a foreign object? 

Yes

Call your child's
healthcare provider
immediately or go to 
the nearest emergency room

No

Wheezing started suddenly after medicine, an allergic food or bee sting.

Yes

Call your child's
healthcare provider
immediately or go to 
the nearest emergency room

No

Is your child wheezing so badly that he/she cannot talk

Yes

Call your child's
healthcare provider
immediately or go to 
the nearest emergency room

No

If your child has asthma, is the wheezing getting worse? Or is your child not getting better with treatment?

Yes

Call your child's
healthcare provider
immediately!

No

Is your child short of breath and/or coughing up bubbly pink or white phlegm?

Yes

Call your child's
healthcare provider
immediately!

No

In addition to wheezing, your child is vomiting and can't keep liquids down or shows signs of dehydration (dryness in the mouth, no wet diapers)

Yes

Call your child's
healthcare provider
immediately!

No

Your child is breathing very fast, more than 40 breaths in 1 minute.

Yes

Call your child's
healthcare provider
immediately!

No

You can see your child's skin pull in between the ribs with each breath or your child has to sit up to be able to breathe.

Yes

Call your child's
healthcare provider
immediately!

No

Does your child have wheezing, a cough, and a fever of 102°F or higher?

Yes

Call your child's
healthcare provider

No

Your child becomes increasing lethargic or irritable

Yes

Call your child's
healthcare provider
immediately!

 

As a reminder, this information should not be relied on as medical advice and is not intended to replace the advice of your child’s pediatrician. Please read our full disclaimer.

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