Subscribe to the free KidsGrowth weekly email newsletter by entering your email address below.





















  

  

Advertisements:
Advertising links will direct you off of the KidsGrowth Web site. KidsGrowth is neither responsible for nor does it necessarily endorse the privacy practices, content or products of these sites.

Should schools "profile" all students to identify those who may become violent?
Yes: No:

Quick reference medical handouts used by Pediatric offices


I need information on preschoolers spitting
    
The first step in changing any behavior is understanding it. Let's think about why your preschooler may be spitting. Some reasons include: it gets attention, it gives power, it is hard to stop and parents react quickly. Determine if this is copycat spitting. Perhaps there is an adult in his life who spits, or another child in the class who spits.

Spitting, like biting, is usually an expression of frustration, and occurs when children can't handle situations in which they are placed. For example, you may see spiting when children under three are required to paly cooperatively and this reflects lack of coping skills with events such as when another child takes a toy away. Sometimes children spit if playing with children who are bigger and stronger than they are. Here are some things you can do:

  • If you can, get in first and cut down the situations that the child cannot cope with.
  • Try to keep group play to short periods and small groups. Watch for situations where two children might want the same toy and step in first to distract them.
  • Children in group play need close adult supervision, especially if they are known to spit or bite. However even the best supervision, unless it is one-to-one, will not prevent some children from spitting or biting.
  • If your child does spit, say firmly "We don't spit. It hurts people's feelings" and remove him or her immediately from the situation. Keep the child near an adult for a while but without much interaction for a minute or two as sort of a cooling off period. Then say something like, "you were angry because someone took your toy. The next time you are angry like this, tell me and I will help you." You could even practice with your child what he or she could say when angry.
  • If the child who caused the original frustration is a frequent "swiper" of toys, you might have both practice asking for toys, sharing, expressing frustration with words instead of less acceptable means, etc.

 

As a reminder, this information should not be relied on as medical advice and is not intended to replace the advice of your child’s pediatrician. Please read our full disclaimer.

Advertisements:
Advertising links will direct you off of the KidsGrowth Web site. KidsGrowth is neither responsible for
nor does it necessarily endorse the privacy practices, content or products of these sites.





| home | contact us | about us |

| parenting & behavioral | child development | growth milestones |

| childhood conditions | seesaw | book reviews | Advertise on KidsGrowth


Copyright © 1999-2014 KG Investments, LLC.

Usage Policy and Disclaimer and Privacy Policy



Web Design by Gecko Media