"trench mouth" or strep infection around the gums although you haven't been able to get a tho">




 
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My 2 1/2 year old is being treated for strep throat. (antibiotic: amoxicillin) I've noticed that she's been drooling a lot, (she sucks her thumb) and the drool has been light brown at times. This morning while I was brushing her teeth I noticed her gums were bleeding. The only thing I found related on this site was trench mouth. However, I don't see any sores in her mouth. It is hard to get a look in there though. What should I do to treat this? I'm afraid she doesn't know how to 'rinse' her mouth, so . .. Thanks.
    
We feel your child probably has "trench mouth" or strep infection around the gums although you haven't been able to get a thorough look. Some of the brownish or blood tinged drool also could be coming from her very red, infected tonsils. Do you remember seeing if the throat swab was blood tinged when the culture was obtained? Many children with acute strep throat will have very swollen red tonsils which will actually bleed when a culture is obtained and may perhaps bleed or ooze a bit if chewed food passes by the swollen, red tonsils. While her mouth might feel more comfortable and might smell better if she would "swish and spit" after eating or drinking, I would not fight over this with a two year old. It is very important that you get the antibiotic to go down and that she takes all ten days of the medication. You certainly should notify your pediatrician if she is spitting out or not swallowing the antibiotic, and have her seen right away if she is having increasing difficulties with swallowing her own saliva and other secretions, or if her fever is going up or if she is becoming increasingly hoarse or not wanting to talk. Have her drink plenty of fluids; popsicles or frozen Pedialyte pops may help her symptoms.

 

As a reminder, this information should not be relied on as medical advice and is not intended to replace the advice of your child’s pediatrician. Please read our full disclaimer.

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