Subscribe to the free KidsGrowth weekly email newsletter by entering your email address below.





















  

  

Advertisements:
Advertising links will direct you off of the KidsGrowth Web site. KidsGrowth is neither responsible for nor does it necessarily endorse the privacy practices, content or products of these sites.

Should schools "profile" all students to identify those who may become violent?
Yes: No:

Quick reference medical handouts used by Pediatric offices


Could you please tell me how long stomatitis is contagious?
    
Stomatitis, or viral stomatitis, is a common infection in kids usually between ages one and three years of age.. The child will run a fever, drool quite a bit, and be very uncomfortable. Parents will notice single or multiple small ulcers on gum tissue and the linings inside the mouth. The child may refuse to eat or drink if the infection involves the back of the throat or esophagus. Parents may also notice a foul odor in five to seven days due to overgrowth of bacteria in the ulcers. Using antibiotics at this point might make the situation even worse by allowing an overgrowth of yeast (candida).

This illness can be caused by a number of viruses, including the herpes simplex virus type I, Coxsackie virus (types 4 and 16), varicella virus, and measles virus. Viral stomatitis is highly contagious and spread by direct contact with infected secretions or lesion, or by airborne droplets produced by sneezing and coughing. The infection will improve on its own in three to five days. If the cold sore or fever blister lasts longer than five days and develops a honey crust, it usually means a secondary infection with group A streptococcus bacteria.

The period of time that children with viral stomatitis can transmit the infection depends on the virus causing the illness. Measles and varicella (chickenpox) are most contagious slightly 1 -2 two days before the onset of fever to 4-6 days for varicella and less than 7 days for measles. Herpes simplex primary infection is contagious one or two days before symptoms and 14 days after the fever is gone. Youngsters with coxsackievirus infection (which, incidently, does not involved the gums), are usually contagious for a week or less.

Unfortunately, stomatitis is not treatable beyond making the child comfortable. Since the illness is highly contagious, parents should wash their hands after contact with the infected child. In addition, wash the child’s hands frequently and do not send them back to day care until the ulcers and fever are gone for twenty four hours. In addition, wash any toys that may have been in their mouth with soap and water.

For additional information about canker sores on our site, please click here.

 

As a reminder, this information should not be relied on as medical advice and is not intended to replace the advice of your child’s pediatrician. Please read our full disclaimer.

Advertisements:
Advertising links will direct you off of the KidsGrowth Web site. KidsGrowth is neither responsible for
nor does it necessarily endorse the privacy practices, content or products of these sites.


viagra online sales visit

District court for the eastern district of pennsylvania dc this process was site address http://www.drcatalona.com/quest/quest_fall05_1.htm generic viagra usa concerned that owing to the inadequacy of current minimum financial and.




| home | contact us | about us |

| parenting & behavioral | child development | growth milestones |

| childhood conditions | seesaw | book reviews | Advertise on KidsGrowth


Copyright © 1999-2014 KG Investments, LLC.

Usage Policy and Disclaimer and Privacy Policy



Web Design by Gecko Media